New year, first half. Literately.

Miscellaneous

January 1st is such a motivating day. I love the fresh start to a new year and the excited buzz around it. I’ve always been a sucker for New Year’s resolutions, too. I think I love the promise of trying to better yourself, making a change, doing something different. (This love for resolutions probably has something to do with the fact that I love Mondays too.) *Pause for astonishment here* I can’t help it, I just love a fresh new start and reinventing yourself.

For the past few weeks or so I’ve been thinking about my intentions for 2013. Now I’ve been working out about four days a week and I feel good. I feel strong both physically and mentally. I’ve always thrown around the idea in my head about the Cleveland Marathon. Now I’m no where near marathon ready, but they also offer a 5K, 10K and half.

I’ve ran five 5Ks, which are always a fun little workout, but in my book it’s just not that big of an accomplishment anymore. After a while I have begun to expect more out of myself. So I threw around the 10K idea. Hmm 6.2 seems legit. The most I’ve ever ran at one time was eight miles, which was during the peek of a really good summer of running two years ago. (I had also just broken up with a really terrible, very bad, no-good guy though, so that fueled a lot of my fire!) So to prove a point to myself, and to basically just be a smart ass, I ran almost 6.5 miles at the gym last week.

workout6Not so smart on my body, but it did a wonder on my head. I was so ecstatic and thrilled at the end of my workout that for a brief moment I had tears in my eyes. It was truly so, so, SO tough. But I wanted to prove to myself that if I could whip out a 10K distance out of no where, than it wouldn’t be that hard on race day….and so, I would HAVE to sign up for the half marathon if I wanted to challenge myself.

So with Christmas money burning a whole in my pocket, I signed up for my first half marathon on May 19th in downtown Cleveland.

regishalfI am a combination of terrified, excited, nervous, worried and thrilled. I have wanted to be a part of a marathon for as long as I can remember, and finally I am making this happen! No more “maybe someday” or “well I’ve always wanted to but…” excuses. My cool $70. 68 will also add as a little reminder that it’s a done deal! And what’s even more exciting, I’ve talked the boyfriend into running it with me! He still has yet to register, but he’s the kinda swell guy that would pretty much do anything I ask him to do. *Pause for eye roll*

I’ve been researching like crazy the past few days. Training schedules, tips, anything. I’ve decided on this 18-week schedule that I found on the marathon’s home page, which puts me for the week of January 13th to get this baby started.

So what do I need to know? What are the best half marathon/training tips? How do you guys stay motivated? What do you do to train/get ready for a half? Any and all advice is welcome!

Sponsoring Races: a PR approach

Miscellaneous, Running

I’m running the Black Squirrel 5K on Saturday in Kent, Ohio. More info about the race can be found here.

As I prepare for the race, I started thinking about the companies and organizations that sponsor races, whether they are 5K’s, 10K’s, full marathons or half’s. Not only do main company’s sponsor full races, but think of all the gift bags and free stuff (YES!) that you get post race most time.

Cleveland Marathon 2010

Cleveland Marathon 2010

I’ve received everything from free T-shirts and ID tags, to free four packs of Muscle Milk, water bottles and free food samples. A lot of time coupons are often stuffed into these “runners swag bag” as one race I ran in June called it.

What are some of the best, worse and even weirdest things you’ve gotten for free after running a race?

As I was saying, why do companies and organizations choose to sponsor races and give out free things?

Of course the most obvious reason – it get’s the company’s name out there. It’s all about the prospect to sell more products. For giving out free things, there’s hopefully a return in getting new customers and sales. Companies sponsor races out of advertising budgets because that’s just what it is, advertising to potential consumers.

Companies want you to sponsor them in the best possible light – I think there is a certain special relationship between sponsors and runners because runners are so passionate about what they do. It’s like tapping into a new consumer demographic.

Sponsoring a race or marathon is great PR for a company or organization, it can show a different side to what one normally see’s in a company.

Dick’s Sporting Goods sponsors the Pittsburgh Marathon (which I’ve always secretly wanted to run even though I hate Pittsburgh with a passion.) Rite Aide sponsors the Cleveland Marathon (which I also want to run if I can whip my butt into shape by then – hey I’m working on it and alright, alright, the half is probably going to be more realistic for me as of right now since there’s only 46 days left ’til race day.)

Sponsorship of race by Rite Aid

Sponsorship of race by Rite Aid

Also the famous Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure organization is another huge sponsor of races and charities. Next time you find yourself in the grocery store take a look at all the pink labels that certain foods like Cambell’s and Yoplait sponsor in turning labeling pink for a certain amount of time.

Take a look at the hugely impressive list of corporate sponsors for Susan G. Komen here. If that doesn’t say good things about a company or organization then I don’t know what does. There’s a certain level of respect and generosity that comes to a company the sponsors races. The company can really benefit from this in the eyes of the community.

As an inspiring PR pro, I want to be a part of a company or organization that sponsors some sort of charity race. Nothing feels better then raising money and trying to help those in need and all companies and organization should strive to try and make that a part of the business’s plan and moral.